Abruzzo – Natural Parks, mountains, and sea beaches

Abruzzo

Abruzzo holds a record: environmental laws protect 30 percent of its territory.

No other region in Europe can boast as much. Not without good reason is it known as the region of parks, the ideal target for a naturalistic vacation.

There are three national parks, one regional park and many protected sites and nature reserves: in a region like this, it seems natural that the provincial capital is called L’Aquila (The Eagle).

This guide leads you in a visit to Abruzzo, starting from L’Aquila, all the sea resorts, and the National Park.

It covers Abruzzo cuisine, with a section on the specialty Foods of Abruzzo, and lists many regional recipes with active links to the recipe pages. It also contains the local wines.

It includes a comprehensive section on Abruzzo’s history, from the essential pre-Roman age, through the historic Roman era, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the Baroque period, and the Modern Age.

It includes a comprehensive section on Abruzzo’s history, from the essential pre-Roman age, through the historic Roman era, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the Baroque period, and the Modern Age.

It includes photos and descriptions of the attractions, as well as travel info.

It is ideal for use on your smartphone; it has many reviews of the restaurants in the localities covered. If you have an active internet connection, the guide has links to the review pages, and in any case, you have the necessary info: address, phone number together with the review.

Online stores where you can buy the book.
The main course of Abruzzo: Chitarra pasta cooking class
Welcome to Abruzzo

Neither part of fashion-conscious, Ferrari-producing northern Italy, nor the siesta-loving, anarchic world of the south, Abruzzo is something of an enigma. Despite its proximity to Rome and its long history of tribalism and pre-Roman civilization, it sits well down the pecking order of Italian regions in terms of touristic allure.

Notwithstanding, this gritty mountainous domain, rocked sporadically by earthquakes, remains refreshingly unique. Herein lies a higher concentration of protected land than anywhere else in Italy, some of the last vestiges of large wild fauna on the continent, and a patchwork of individualistic towns and villages whose folkloric traditions go back as far as the Italic tribes who founded them.

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